A Cut Above

If you want to know how to cook prime rib roast, it begins at the market when selecting your cut of beef.

Prime vs. choice.

Prime is the highest grade of beef available for consumer purchase. Prime cuts signify more fat marbling.

During the cooking process, the fat melts… translating to very tender, juicy and flavorful meat.

The word “prime” in the name, “Prime Rib,” can be very misleading. It does not mean that the roast you’re buying is prime grade.

Look for the USDA Prime Grade shield:

How to Cook Prime Rib Roast | Sister Spice Recipe

Oftentimes, prime cuts need to be special ordered through premium markets. Although some wholesale club stores offer these cuts throughout the year.

Choice is the second highest grade for beef and is gently marbled. For prime rib, we think this cut also yields excellent results at a fraction of the price. 

 

Fat is Your Friend

Look for a well-marbled roast regardless of grade.

And DON’T remove or trim the fat cap as some recipes advise. Remember: fat = flavor.

We like a bone-in roast for its pretty presentation. But it’s more than that. Bones also add great flavor. 

 

Sitting Pretty

Let the roast sit at room temperature for a minimum of 90 minutes or up to 2 hours prior to roasting.

Don’t skip this step as your roast will not cook evenly.

Salt your roast a minimum of 90 minutes and up to 36 hours before cooking. Salt acts as a tenderizer and increases moisture retention of the roasts interior when cooking.

If salting for more than a couple of hours prior to cooking, leave the roast uncovered in the refrigerator. The result: a better browned, crusty exterior when roasted.

 

The Roasting Method

We love the high-heat / low-heat cooking method.

We start the cooking process at high heat for 15 minutes. Ensuring herb and peppercorn crust heaven!

Then we lower the heat, protecting the roast’s tender interior.

Remove the roast at 111 degrees Fahrenheit allowing for carryover cooking, and yielding a beautiful medium-rare result. The temperature will continue to rise as the roast rests.

Transfer your roast to a carving board immediately after removing from the oven. Let it rest, uncovered, at room temperature for 30 minutes.

125 degrees Fahrenheit marks medium-rare. End cuts will please those that enjoy medium-well.

 

Jump to recipe

 

Must-Have Tools

Regardless of whether you choose prime or choice grades of beef, these premium roasts are not inexpensive.

Ensure your kitchen is tooled for prime rib roast success. 

 

Don’t even think about investing in a prime rib roast without high-quality thermometers.

We use more than one kind.

We use an oven thermometer with a leave-in oven probe. No need to open the oven with this professional grade thermometer that can be programmed to alert you when the roast reaches a set temperature.

We like this one by ThermoWorks: 

Chef Alarm by ThermoWorks | Sister Spice Easy Everyday Gourmet

Chef Alarm by ThermoWorks

 

A high-quality instant-read thermometer is a must-have. Not only for perfect prime rib… for poultry, other proteins, and more. 

We use the instant-read to check against the oven temperature reading.

The ThermoPop is an excellent instant-read thermometer at a steal of a price, just $34.

ThermoPop Instant Read Thermometer | Sister Spice Easy Everyday Gourmet

ThermoPop Instant Read Thermometer by ThermoWorks

 

Use a good roasting pan with a rack.

A good, heavy-bottomed roaster is essential to a brown crust and delicious pan drippings.

The pan will be transferred to the stovetop to create a delicious au jus.

Carving Tools

This bad boy roast needs robust carving tools.

You’ll want a quality carving knife and fork. And, a sturdy cutting board with a trench to capture any juices.

Nice to Have

We love a good mini-chopper to create our peppercorn crust paste. You can also use a blender. 

 

Your Roast Deserves a Good Wine

The prime rib’s richness and higher fat content stand up well to a big, powerful, full-bodied wine.

Tannic wines like Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux style blends, Syrah and Petite Sirah are great choices.

The tannins found in red wine soften on the palate when paired with high protein, rare, red meats. It’s a harmonious balance.

Consider your cooking method when choosing wine. Roasting intensifies the flavor.

Roasted prime rib pairs perfectly with a weighty red.

Cabernet Sauvignon and cooler climate Syrah have high-level tannins and nice acidity that pair well with rich foods.

If you enjoy red wine with a big fruit backbone, Syrah and Petite Sirah won’t disappoint!

Here are several reds we like, at all price levels from bargain to splurge:

 

Sensational Sides for a Memorable Meal

Chances are, you want to know how to cook prime rib roast because you’re serving it for a special occasion.

Why not up your side game too?

Our truffle mashed potatoes and green beans amandine are wonderful with this decadent roast. 

 

Leftover Love

One of our favorite things about prime rib is having leftovers. 

We enjoy delicious prime rib dip sliders on small dinner rolls with reserved au jus on the side. Holy moly, are they good!

 

Jump to recipe

 

Print Recipe
Peppercorn Crusted Prime Rib with Red Wine Jus Yum
Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - 1080 | Sister Spice
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Tap the cart icon to add to your shopping list.
This recipe is in your shopping list.
Course Main Course
Cuisine New American
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 60-90 minutes
Passive Time 90 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Main Course
Cuisine New American
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 60-90 minutes
Passive Time 90 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - 1080 | Sister Spice
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Tap the cart icon to add to your shopping list.
This recipe is in your shopping list.
Instructions
  1. Place roast fat cap side up on a rack in a roasting pan or directly in a roasting pan. Rub fat cap with kosher salt. Let stand at room temperature for 60 minutes.
    Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - step 2 | Sister Spice
  2. Adjust rack to lower third position in the oven. Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. In a mini-food processor, combine peppercorns, garlic, rosemary leaves, and olive oil.
    Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - step 3 | Sister Spice
  4. Chop/process to a fine paste consistency. Alternately, peppercorns can also be ground in a clean coffee bean grinder or pepper mill. Garlic and rosemary can be chopped fine and combined with olive oil and ground peppercorns in a small bowl.
    Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - step 4 | Sister Spice
  5. Rub the fat cap of the roast with peppercorn, garlic and herb paste. Let stand for an additional 30 minutes at room temperature. Place an oven safe thermometer in the middle side of the roast until it reaches the center of the roast. Ensure thermometer is not touching a bone.
    Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - step 5 | Sister Spice
  6. Roast for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Roast until roast reaches an internal temperature of 111 degrees Fahrenheit. Estimate about 15 minutes per pound.
  7. Remove roast from roasting pan to a carving board. Let stand at room temperature, uncovered, for a 1/2 hour before slicing so the juices can redistribute.
    Prime rib – how to cook prime rib roast - step 7 | Sister Spice
  8. Pour the drippings from the roasting pan into a fat separator. Discard the excess fat.
  9. A few minutes before carving meat, position roasting pan on two burners. Bring to medium-high heat. Add red wine, de-glazing the roasting pan with a whisk. Reduce wine by about half, approximately 3-5 minutes. Add de-fatted drippings back to roasting pan. Whisk to combine. Whisk in beef stock cooking for an additional few minutes. Serve.
Recipe Notes

Check ingredients and/or manufacturer's website to ensure beef stock is gluten free.

Recipe courtesy of www.sisterspicekitchen.com 
© 2018 Spice Brands, Inc. All rights reserved.